Review: Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror

cvr_now-they-call-me-infidel-why-i-renounced-jihad-for-america-israel-and-the-war-on-terrorNow They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror, by Nonie Darwish

MY RATING: 4/5 Stars

FTC NOTICE: Library Book

REVIEW: The beginning of this review yields to a much favorable position as it progresses. “Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror” ends much better than it starts, and it is the first book for which I considered punctuation, paragraph transitions, and chapter allocations to be a signification part of a review. It is not enjoyable to have to do a drill-down on how a book is edited, but it is the poor editing of this book that originally lowered my rating of the text. Had it not been for the subject matter combined with both the intent and voice of the author, this book would have received a one-star rating and placed on my “discards” shelf. It is with the aforementioned in mind that I wish to touch on the most blatant things that have been considered in my review.

Mis-use (or lack thereof in some cases) of punctuation made this book a challenging read…so difficult, in fact, that I opted to see which company published it. The publisher was Penguin Books, and one would expect a higher caliber editing job from such a well-established entity. Several sentences had to be re-read, and I imagined punctuation in other parts of them in order to understand what the author wished to convey. It was amazing how significantly a comma changed the meaning of a sentence! Flow of ideas from one paragraph to another consistently lacked cohesion, making it choppy and challenging to follow a storyline. Ideas that clearly belonged in separate chapters created pause for the reader because I didn’t always understand their placement within the context of a specific part of Nonie Darwish’s story.

It was Ms. Darwish’s voice and intent that pushed me to read further. The disjointed details of early parts of the book finally came together enough to understand her over-arching theme: radical Islam is born overseas and is becoming homegrown in the USA; these people are very determined and will do anything to destroy anyone/anything that they consider to be of infidel nature. The author’s history, as well as that of her native Egypt, were detailed so that the reader could understand and appreciate Darwish’s political, humanitarian, and moral positions. She emphasized how thankful she was to have become an American and that her sentiment was an atypical one. People she once knew as moderate Muslims had become radicals once they arrived in America. The author explained that it was not unusual to find professional students (ie: a student of 12 years without a degree) that had become leaders of Muslim Student Associations and were backed by Saudi oil money to stay on college campuses; and, they were (are) using the universities as conversion centers for jihadism.

The author expressed a deep amount of respect for people of other nationalities, cultures, and faiths and made it clear that radical Islam demonstrates no tolerance nor respect for anything outside of itself and very little variation within its religion. The reading of “Now They Call Me Infidel” definitely required persistence. What pushed the rating of this book up to a 4-star one was the fact that the author made me want to learn more about the topics she addressed. If you put down this book because you found it unreadable, I ask that you consider making another attempt at reading it; once you are well into the text, everything eventually makes sense. It offers a solid education that cannot be ignored.

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