Review: The Only Language They Understand: Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine

The Only Language They Understand: Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine by Nathan Thrall

MY RATING: 5/5 Stars

FTC NOTICE: Free Review Copy from the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program (in exchange for an honest review)

REVIEW: When undertaking the negotiations of, or simply reading about, the long-standing Arab-Israeli conflict, everyone becomes aware of how influences within and beyond the borders of the Middle East become a party to the issue. “The Only Language They Understand: Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine by Nathan Thrall, investigates the dynamics of these relationships and how they influence outcomes. His thesis establishes the element of force as core to achieving change, regardless of country and/or organization. “Compromise on each side has been driven less by the promise of peace than the aversion of pain…not limited to bloodshed. Economic sanctions, boycotts, threats, unarmed protests, and other forms of confrontation have been just as important in bringing about ideological concessions and territorial withdrawals. “Force” in this broader sense has, sadly, proved the only language “they” understand” (2).

Mr. Thrall explained the suppressive aspect(s) of the Oslo Accords, despite not being viewed that way by international courts because “the agreements” maintained a status quo. He made the reader think differently about the Camp David Accords, the Oslo Accords, Madrid Conference of 1991 and other related conference outcomes. I had viewed them as a tremendous amount of beneficial progress toward peace in the Middle East–especially after reading “The Path to Geneva: The Quest for a Permanent Solution, 1996-2003,” by Yossi Beilin. At the time of Beilin’s work, great achievements were made; but, in the long-run, it looked like situations eroded. To truly understand the making of each stage of agreements, readers needed more knowledge of the context, language, and time-frame in which the agreements were reached, and Nathan Thrall did an excellent job of covering those details along with some over-arching themes in support of his thesis:

*Intifadas, wars, terrorism, and other aggressions.
*Exporting the Holocaust to the Palestine Mandate.
*Zionism and the diaspora.
*Revisionist history and racism.
*Corruption.
*Frameworks for peace and statehood.
*Foreign powers and positioning.
*Decision making processes: short-term versus long-term reality.
*Periphery Doctrine effectivity.
*Collaborations between Palestinians and Israelis.
*America’s role the in the peace process: mediator or trouble-maker?

The author made it easy to recognize how themes played out repeatedly and ultimately existed as a form of force. He also made the reader ponder intelligent, though likely unpopular and uncomfortable, questions: Would the diaspora have survived without a separate Jewish state? Who truly had the right to promise Palestine to the Jewish people? Did America need to be involved in this peace process? Did the parties squander their opportunities to reach a two-state solution? Did some of the Palestinian leadership carry responsibility for continued nationlessness and some of the harm to their people? Was the author pro-Israel or in favor of the Palestinians? Ultimately, there was no denying that the author did a phenomenal job in supporting his thesis while writing a very interesting, fact-filled, thought-provoking book. Nathan Thrall’s “ The Only Language They Understand: Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine ” enveloped a highly-recommendable read that earned a well-deserved five-star rating.

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Review: Bitter Scent: The Case of L’Oreal, Nazis, and the Arab Boycott

Bitter Scent: The Case of L’Oreal, Nazis, and the Arab Boycott by Michael Bar-Zohar, PhD.

MY RATING: 5/5 Stars

FTC NOTICE: Library Book

REVIEW: Michael Bar-Zohar’s “Bitter Scent: The Case of L’Oreal, Nazis, and the Arab Boycott” garnered an easy five-star rating from me. This book had it all: history, smut, politics, international intrigue, foreign policy, terrorism, psychological warfare, a touch of romance and so much more–all interwoven expertly–something difficult to accomplish given the amount and range of content covered by the author. The story began as a biography of Jean Frydman, a French immigrant from Poland who became a leader of the Nazi Resistance in WWII’s, Holocaust-driven Vichy France. He eventually worked his way up into the position of a vested partner for L’Oreal…only to be covertly fired by historical Nazis with the goal of illegally complying with the Arab boycott.

Dr. Bar-Zohar explained that the Arab boycott was designed to destroy Israel via the prevention of commerce with any organization(s) that had ties to it. This effected L’Oreal when it purchased another company that had previously built one factory in Israel as well as another entity that had a subsidiary or secondary brand’s facility there, too; and, L’Oreal partner Jean Frydman maintained a dual citizenship status in France and Israel.

When the Arab League “demanded a list of all affiliates” (pg. 8), the reader began to learn about how the League’s political system interfaced with L’Oreal. This boycott had the potential to financially damage additional corporations outside of the beauty industry and those which a person would not have typically associated with L’Oreal at the time: Nestle, Baxter International, Panavision and others. A progressive reveal of the vastness and unexpected international business holdings of L’Oreal took place while the author provided a simultaneous education pertaining to L’Oreal’s Nazi era history of three politically and financially powerful people, how they worked to hide anti-Semitic and collaborationist activities and pasts while they gained power, and (ultimately) how they were linked to Jean Frydman’s removal and attempted divestiture.

Bitter Scent: The Case of L’Oreal, Nazis, and the Arab Boycott” impressed me with how well Michael Bar-Zohar conducted his investigative research and taught the reader about a set of parallel histories and how they intersected. It taught the reader that anti-Semitism never ended and that, surprisingly, it existed even within the Jewish community. This story made me want to read books about Vichy France as well as more texts about the Helena Rubinstein empire. The author’s writing style made me wish I could read the book at a much faster pace. It was so well written! My desire to read more pieces by this author led me to add a few more of his books to my reading list; in doing so, I learned that Michael Bar-Zohar also authored books under the pseudonym “Michael Barak.” I highly recommend this book and suggest that readers consider his other investigative pieces.

ARC Reveal: The Only Language They Understand: Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine

cvr_The Only Language They Understand- Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine by Nathan ThrallThe Only Language They Understand: Forcing Compromise in Israel and Palestine by Nathan Thrall

FTC NOTICE: Free Review Copy via LibraryThing Early Reviewers

BOOK INFO
*Genre: Political Science
*Published by Metropolitan Books (April, 2017)
*320-336 pages
*ISBN: 1627797092 / 9781627797092

CONTENTS
(Pages ix-x)
*Forcing Compromise
*Domination: Israeli Conquest and Its Justifications
*Collaboration: Easing Occupation as a Failed Strategy of Ending It
*Confrontation: Palestinian Pressure and Its Limits
*Negotiation: Political Horizons, and Other Euphemisms for False Hope

AUTHOR HIGHLIGHTS
*Analyst and Commentator: Arab-Israeli Conflict
*Senior Analyst: International Crisis Group
*Regular Contributor: The New York Review of Books
*Regular Contributor: The London Review of Books
*Regular Contributor: The New York Times

Quote: The Drone Memos: Targeted Killing, Secrecy and the Law

The Drone Memos: Targeted Killing, Secrecy and the Law by Jameel Jaffer

FTC NOTICE: Library Book

QUOTE: “By characterizing the struggle against terrorism as a borderless war, the United States performed a remarkable feat of legal alchemy, transforming what would otherwise have been the illegal and extrajudicial killing of civilians into the ostensibly legitimate exercise of military force. Unlawful assassination became supposedly lawful targeting. Many of the U.S. government’s targets were nowhere near Afghanistan or Iraq or any other actual battlefield, but the theory, in its boldest form, was that the battlefield is everywhere because terrorists can be found anywhere” (39).

Review: Shah of Shahs

cvr_shah-of-shahs-by-ryszard-kapuscinskiShah of Shahs, by Ryszard Kapuściński, William R. Brand (Translator), Katarzyna Mroczkowska-Brand (Translator), and Margaret Atwood (Contributor: “Afterward”)

MY RATING: 4/5 Stars

FTC NOTICE: Library Book (both times)

REVIEW: “Only a few months ago it was an achievement, like winning a lottery, to get a room in this city. Despite the many, many hotels, there was such an avalanche of people that new arrivals had to rent beds in private hospitals just to have a place to stay. Now the boom of easy money and dazzling transactions is over, the local businessmen are lying low, and the foreign partners have fled, leaving everything behind (5). Tourism has fallen to zero; all international traffic has frozen. Some hotels were burned down, others are closed or empty, and in one of them, guerrillas have set up their headquarters. Today the city is engrossed in its own affairs, it doesn’t need foreigners, it doesn’t need the world” (5-6). Everything has suddenly changed: welcome to Iran’s Islamic Revolution

When Iran’s last shah fled his country, he terminated approximately 2,500 years of monarchy and a few decades of significant progress in women’s rights, religious freedom, the arts, technology, business, oil and nuclear energy, plus military might. Polish journalist Ryszard Kapuściński had been assigned to Iran cover Ayatollah Khomeini’s return and events surrounding the revolution. As he watched the television to see the initial speech, the author noted the following: “Nothing in that murderous climate would seem to favor reflection and contemplation, yet Qom is a place of religious fervor, rabid orthodoxy, mysticism, and faith militant.  It contains five hundred mosques and the nation’s biggest seminaries.  Koranic scholars and the guardians of tradition quarrel in Qom; the venerable ayatollahs convene their councils there; Khomeini rules the country from Qom.” (6).

Kapuściński authored “Shah of Shahs” as a way to communicate timelines via dagguerotypes (photos and cassette recordings). The journalist’s contemplative and wise voice definitely came through as the reader took in descriptions of images and circumstances. The approach seemed distant, yet intimate, as he described Iran’s vast history, the lead-up to revolution and as well as a psychological profile of the country’s leadership and sociological make-up of its citizenry…the latter of which appeared to be significantly misunderstood by the Pahlavis. He designed the book as a travel log, an approach consistent with another work of his that I recently read, about his travels through one of Iran’s neighbors: the Soviet Empire. Its corresponding compendium titled “Imperium,” reveals a consistency in the author’s qualities; one must read both works to recognize how true they were to the author’s writing style and in their paralleled histories, which made sense given their intertwining relationship(s). “Shah of Shahs” heavily focused on the following themes:

*Fervent nationalism: mandated unique language—Farsi.
*Petroleum business: so much money, so little for the people.
*Regime change.
*Inertia of revolution.
*Societal changes: progression, regression, repression.
*Power-struggles and hierarchy: familial, governmental, international.
*Paradoxical histories: lessons of opposites.

Shah of Shahs” was the first book containing the great lessons of Ryszard Kapuściński. In 2013 I rated the book an easy five stars. On this re-read, and after reading so many more works dealing with the same topics, my excitement seemed a bit tempered; then (early 2017) I gave the book a four-star rating. Please note that he book remained as recommendable as before. It did an excellent job of taking a large amount of information and condensing it into nuggets of the most important data points necessary to understand the ascension and reign of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi. The author’s voice and format remained unique when compared to many other reading experiences I had in the four years between the first and second reads. I simply did not find myself as impressed with the work as before. One could combine the two ratings, to yield four-and-a-half starts, then round them up to five stars…I guess; but, the gusto just did not seem to still be there on the second read. What it did lead me to was the intent to read more Kapuściński in 2017 (which was exactly what I did with his book, “Imperium).

Review: Why Israel Can’t Wait: The Coming War Between Israel and Iran

Why Israel Can’t Wait: The Coming War Between Israel and Iran by Jerome R. Corsi

MY RATING: 2/5 Stars

FTC NOTICE: Purchased Book.

REVIEW: I always admired people who supported Israel, and I believed that Dr. Jerome R. Corsi meant well when he wrote, “Why Israel Can’t Wait: The Coming War Between Israel and Iran.” His intentions were certainly as praise-worthy as his high level of formal education (PhD.), extensive work experience and vast knowledge. However, this piece did not sufficiently achieve his stated goals; the first of which began with addressing the Islamic Republic of Iran.

“Prior to the June 12 (2009) election, Iran expert Michael Ledeen of the “Foundation for the Defense of Democracies” claimed Mousavi was not a revolutionary but rather “a leader who has been made into a revolutionary by a movement that grew up around him” (14).  “But the impression in the United States that Mousavi was a reformist is entirely wrong” (14)..the real revolutionary is Mousavi’s wife, Zahra Rahnavard, and the real question is why Ayatollah Khamenei allowed her to be positioned that way in the 2009 presidential election” (14). This was an excellent question, one which led specifically to the “regime change” discussion, seemingly regardless of who won the election.

However, during Iran’s 2009 post-election protests, Obama possibly missed an opportunity for regime change, according to Dr. Corsi. My issue with that specific point rested in the fact that the United States conducted a coup d’état in the 1950s with its overthrow of Iran’s democratically-elected Mohammad Mossaddeq, which restored Mohammed Reza Pahlavi to his thrown. (“Patriot of Persia: Mohammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup” by Christopher De Bellaigue served as a biographical account of the aging Prime Minister and devout oil nationalist, though its not my favorite account). The regime change gave the appearances that the over-throw worked. Some books that covered this topic in greater detail included: “All the Shah’s Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror” by Stephen Kinzer; “Blood & Oil: A Prince’s Memoir of Iran, From the Shah to the Ayatollah” by Manucher Farmanfarmaian (a Qajar prince) and Roxane Farmanfarmaian, PhD.; “The Fall of Heaven: The Pahlavis and the Final Days of Imperial Iran” by Andrew Scott Cooper, PhD.; and, “The Shah” by Abbas Milani, PhD. (Research Fellow at Hoover Institution (as of this writing) and whose brother served as prime minister to the last Shah and was later assassinated by Ayatollah Khomeini’s regime).

The Shah’s status, however, became temporary, and its long-run consequences spread themselves throughout the globe with particular vitriol pointed toward the United States of America (who conducted the operation as a special favor to one of its historically favorite allies: the British). Corsi seemed to encourage another regime change, as well as additional America-driven modifications to the region, as a solution to a wide range of problems for the USA and Israel with the goal of returning stability to the greater Middle East. Central themes existed as the following:

*Iran’s 2009 post-election protests.
*Regime change dynamics.
*Nuclear weaponization: “A credible nuclear program must have three components: (1) weapons-grade enriched uranium/plutonium source; (2) Medium/Long-range missile system capable of delivering a nuclear weapons payload reliably; and, (3) technology to weaponize into a miniaturized warhead capable of being delivery (29).”
*Regional stability and hegemonic interests.
*Iran and Hamas in the Palestinian Authority.
*Arab-Israeli conflict core issues: “Netanyahu strongly disputed the contention that territory was at the start of the heart of the conflict with the Palestinians” (69).

I thought that the Arab-Israeli conflict could not simply be resolved with border issues being quelled nor re-negotiated and agreed upon by the parties as well.  in fact, Netanyahu’s statement reminded me that the root cause of the conflict was not about borders at all anyway; much of this dispute originated during the Palestine Mandate era and the trouble caused by Yasser Arafat’s uncle, Haj Amin Al-Husseini, (then “The Grand Mufti of Jerusalem”). He willingly and excitedly served as Hitler’s proxy to export Europe’s Holocaust to the Palestine Mandate making a major component of the original conflict about RACISM, RACISM, RACISM not land.  “Icon of Evil: Hitler’s Mufti and the Rise of Radical Islam by Rabbi David G. Dalin adeptly covered this history, and I repeatedly recommended this book to encourage others to view the history of “The Conflict” with either more knowledge or a different perspective than that of a land-grab. As far as said conflict goes, until the parties can agree that their negotiations for specific sessions or summits are on a focused few (ideally one at a time) topics, then no positive movement toward peace can truly be achieved.

While Dr. Corsi did an excellent job of detailing why the Arab-Israeli Conflict could not be simply resolved with the resolution of land boundaries, it seemed that the rest of the book was slammed together and utilized hyperbole. He shared some interesting information and uncommonly-known revelations; but, the work did not really contain anything new (even for its publication time). I wished that the author had shared greater context and perspective.  The piece contained choppiness in its going back-and-forth while trying to put the reader in a constant panic with sweeping generalizations. I felt greatly disappointed that the closing statement under the subchapter name (which mimicked the book’s title) “Why Israel Can’t Wait” led to nothing more than two mini-paragrphs, each containing two sentences. Its over-simplicity revealed incoherence, causing the overall product to present itself as nothing more than than an rushed-to-publish “Op-Ed” in lieu of a quality piece of literature that the author historically-supported reputation provided.

Quote: The Terrorist Next Door–How the Government is Deceiving you About the Islamic Threat

The Terrorist Next Door: How the Government is Deceiving you About the Islamic Threat by Erick Stakelbeck

FTC NOTICE: Purchased Book

Radicalization in the West: The Homegrown Threat identified a four-step process that leads an individual or group to accept jihadist ideology and to act on it:

*Pre-radicalization: The subject is searching for something else in their life and comes into contact with radicalization agents.

*Identification: The individual begins to adopt various changes of dress, mannerisms and lifestyle in accordance with adopting a new set of beliefs.

*Indoctrination: Now involved with a new set of associates, they are subjected to intense ideological training that reinforces jihadist narratives and justifications for violence.

*Jihadization: The individual agrees that violence is necessary for the “defense” of Islam, and is recruited to engage in violent acts.

The report’s authors stress that this process can happen over long periods of time, or can occur rather quickly” (188).

Workspace Wednesday for March 8, 2017

20170308_WorkspaceWedBeautiful deep red carnations–the same color as the flowers found on my wedding dress, worn almost a decade ago. Perhaps that thought compelled me to choose these carnations.   The pictured books were read, with some covered in different shades of red.  Regardless of cover colors, my question became, “How many reviews could be written and posted for these books with a week?”  If you already reviewed any of these works, feel free to share a link to your blog posts about them.  In the meantime, wish me luck on mine!

REVIEWS COMING SOON
Imperium by Ryszard Kapuscinski
Why Israel Can’t Wait: The Coming War Between Israel and Iran by Jerome Corsi, PhD
Operation Shakespeare: The True Story of an Elite International Sting by John Shiffman
The Shah by Abbas Milani (whose brother was Prime Minister under the last Shah of Iran)
Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East, 1776 to the Present by Michael B. Oren
The Siege: 68 Hours Inside the Taj Hotel by Cathy Scott-Clark and Adrian Levy

Review: Princes of Darkness: The Saudi Assault on the West

Princes of Darkness: The Saudi Assault on the West by Laurent Murawiec

MY RATING: 3/5 Stars

FTC NOTICE: Library Book

MOVIE TRAILER: Bhutto

REVIEW: “Let us admit…that the title “prince” is purely formal. Even if one were to respect the right of illiterate and course nomads to call their chiefs princes–we have no reason to be gratuitously discourteous–the demographic explosion of the Al-Saud family has created an endless supply of pseudo-princes. It even seems impossible to count this sub-species, which multiplies uncontrollably. Are there three or eight thousand Saudi “princes”? No one knows. If necessary, it was agreed–politeness to foreigners–to call the dozen bearded men in jellabas “princes.” But five or eight thousand? Inflation, as it is well known, devalues currency. The inflation of princes has devalued the title. Each prince thus bears the title of only one five-thousandth of a prince, so that at diplomatic receptions, the introduction might go: “Royal Highness the five-thousandth of a Prince Bandar,” which would be closer to reality” (229).

Yet, Laurent Murawiec, author of “Princes of Darkness: The Saudi Assault on the West,” wrote a book’s worth of “reasons to be gratuitously discourteous” (229), in his efforts to expose the everything he wanted readers to know about the Saudi Royal Family, he also freely injected caustic language. The author contended that Saudi oil came to life as a result of simply happening to inhabit the land under which the petrol sources rested. He wanted to establish that this royal family was nothing more than a self-propagating orgy of princes and their several wives to create future generations in order to maintain their power. “Saudi Arabia, for its part, modernized nothing. It was in 1957 – – and not in the seventh century – – that King Saud [SIC] issued and edict forbidding women to drive. In the name of Islam, the Saudi-Wahhabi regime has worsened the position of women. Sequestration inside the walls of home, the requirement to wear and an abaya showing only the eyes, and illiteracy and the virtual impossibility of exercising a profession, the prohibition of pursuing education abroad” (14-15), etc. Additional information included the author’s suggestion that the US invasion of Iraq existed as favor to Saudis…under threat of (Iran’s) Shia being able to obtain Iraqi oil reserves and out-power “The Kingdom.” He also delved into the formation of OPEC and OAPEC, asserting themselves as nothing more than political oil cartels, regardless of the fact that that the producing countries simply wanted control over what came from their territories. “Oil, everything comes down to oil” (179). Murawiec clearly had a problem with everybody and everything pertaining to the Saudi Royal Family, defining them as nothing more than Bedouin tribal thieves utilizing their religion as a weapon.

Despite the author’s frequently injected opinions that tended to distract from important historical facts, I enjoyed learning more about the Saudis and their relationship with Pakistan. This alliance may also have been the reason why Zulfikar Ali Bhutto was prohibited from obtaining “The Bomb.” I found this to be particularly interesting because, after seeing the film “Bhutto,” I wondered why Dr. Henry Kissinger adamantly emphasized to Bhutto that he would regret developing nuclear weaponry. After all, the USA developed “The Bomb,” then the USSR did the same thing. China then sensed it needed nuclear weapons to protect itself from the Russians. India felt threatened and started testing its “Bomb;” therefore, it appeared only rational that Pakistan would develop equal-caliber capabilities to protect itself from India. Zulfikar Ali Bhutto was denied this power. General Zia-ul-Haq became Bhutto’s Chief of Staff (most likely at the request of the USA or Saudi Arabia), and then this man seized power via military coup…and got “The Bomb” anyway.

Mr. Murawiec did not go into all of that detail with Pakistan, because his book was about exposing the Saudi Royal Family’s power matrix. Pakistan played a somewhat minute role (in the context of their total power-base). The author explained how Pakistan’s intelligence arm, the ISI, “pulled the wool over the CIA’s eyes, manipulated American policy for its benefit, and came out on top” (77), thereby orchestrating the election(s) of Benazir Bhutto as part of a façade to appease the Western world.

While this review did not share nearly as much as what one can read and learn about in “Princes of Darkness: The Saudi Assault on the West,” my goal was to communicate that the author demonstrated compelling writing skills and strong subject matter knowledge, yet he faltered in maintaining a modicum of professionalism that one would expect from a person with his impressive credentials. I failed to appreciate when he repeatedly injected vitriolic statements such as the following: “We have seen the way in which Saudi Arabia asserted control over Pakistan, or, if you like, the Wahhabi acid bath into which Saudi influence plunged Pakistan” (107). Comments such as this one devalued the crucial information that he wanted exposed; as such, the book’s star rating was reduced.

Review: Hillary’s America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party

Hillary’s America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party by Dinesh D’Souza

MY RATING: 5/5 Stars

FTC NOTICE: Library Book

MOVIE TRAILER:Hillary’s America

“Hillary’s America” is available on DVD, Blu-Ray, and Digital HD now! Order your copy here: http://hillarysamericathemovie.com/#dvd.

REVIEW: This book changes you. It makes you wish that you could unlearn what you have read. It hardens you and breaks your heart, leaving you feeling betrayed and enlightened all at once. You are left feeling helpless while simultaneously being motivated and invigorated to do something. It is time for a change; and, Dinesh D’Souza’s “ Hillary’s America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party” provides the “Hillary” education and calls to action for his readers.

ABOUT HILLARY: “This woman has been in public life for decades, and yet she has accomplished nothing” (1). Everyone who has followed her career knows that Hillary is dishonest to the core” (2). “Yet when is the last time a major political party nominated someone who has been investigated for corruption so many times, and with an ongoing FBI inquiry?” (5). They’ve been doing it under different circumstances all along, and most of America was marketed to, and brainwashed, into thinking just the opposite of the Democratic party.

“Democrats—the mantra goes—are the party of the common man, the ordinary person. For two hundred years, Democrats have been looking out for the little guy, including historically marginalized groups like women, blacks, Hispanics, and other minorities. Where would these people be without the Democratic Party to protect them and secure their basic rights? Democrats are the party of equal rights, civil rights, and human dignity” (7). At least, that is what they want Americans to think. D’Souza masterfully details the history of the Democratic Party, their games, their marketing narrative, plus their schemes, thievery, and plan of national enslavement leading to all-out slavery. The Democrats are nothing that they say they represent and everything that all Americans should fear.

The Clintons have become the modern-era representation of the Democrats, utilizing the Alinsky model, but by changing government from within…and using many “useful idiots” to help them every step of the way. “Alinsky realized he could recruit allies and direct their hatred to the corporations by appealing to motives such as envy, resentment, and hatred, but all packaged in the rhetoric of equality and justice. He had no illusion that any of this was related to actual justice” (183). “For Alinsky, justice is a province of morality, and morality is a scam. Morality is the cloak of power. Activists appeal to the language of morality but recognize that it is a mere disguise” (183).

Everyone in the United States of America needs to read this book. It serves as an educational tool, a wake-up alarm, and a call to action. The Democratic party’s long-term sociopathic behavior must be brought to a halt. Their trended pattern of trying to stop upward mobility and creating modern day plantations in the inner cities must be reversed while simultaneously convincing the many good Americans who came to believe the opposite of what is right for our country’s future. It is with the aforementioned in mind, and so much more contained in Dinesh D’Souza’s book that “ Hillary’s America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party” easily earns its five-star rating.